Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies | Explore the Changing Roles of Gender
University of Pittsburgh

Iris Marion Young Award Ceremony

November 15, 2017 - 5:00pm - 7:00pm

Sponsored by the Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies Program and the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs

Nominations for this year's Iris Marion Young Awards (Staff, Faculty, Graduate, and Undergraduate) are welcome through October 6.  View the Call for Nominations here.

The awards ceremony will include a moderated discussion among award winners about the themes of community engagement, organizing, and bridging theory and practice. All are welcome to attend this free event. 

Book Release Event: "Set the World on Fire"

March 15, 2018 - 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Professor Keisha Blain (History)

Sponsored jointly by the Department of History and the Gender, Sexuality, & Women's Studies Program

Please join us for the launch of Keisha Blain's new book, Set the World on Fire: Black Nationalist Women and the Global Struggle for Freedom (University of Pennsylvania Press, February 2018).

Featuring commentary on the book from:

Robert Trent Vinson, Frances L. and Edwin L. Cummings Associate Professor History and Africana Studies, The College of William and Mary

Spring term '17 graduate seminars:

GSWS2252: Theories of Gender & Sexuality, Prof. Nancy Glazener, Wed. 2:30-5:00

Undergraduate Symposium on Masculinities

The GSWS program held the Undergraduate Symposium on Masculinities on April 21, 2017. Nineteen undergraduate students from the University of Pittsburgh – and one student from Ohio State University – showcased their work on panels and round tables throughout the day. These included “Deconstructing Global Masculinity,” “Images and Interpretations of Masculinities,” “Masculinity and Violence,” “Black Masculinities, Racism, and Whiteness,” and “Masculinity and Privilege.”

GSWS Fall Event Calendar Released

Click here to view a PDF of the GSWS Fall 2017 event lineup.  All events are free and open to the public.  We hope you are able to join us!

Lecture: “Feminist Posthumanism and Life in the Abyss”

January 16, 2018 - 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Stacy Alaimo

Professor Stacy Alaimo is an internationally recognized scholar of the environmental humanities and gender studies. She has published three monographs: Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space (Cornell UP, 2000); Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self (Indiana UP, 2010); and Exposed: Environmental Politics and Pressures in Posthuman Times (U of Minnesota P, 2016).

"Is Transracial the New Transgender?: Rogers Brubaker's Trans and Other Useful Tools for Analyzing a Contemporary Vitriolic Debate"

Since June 2015, when then-President of the NAACP chapter in Spokane, WA, Nkechi Amare Diallo, more commonly known under her birth name Rachel Dolezal, was outed as White by her birth parents, the question of transracialism has generated considerable controversy.

Gayle Rubin Reading Group Session 2

October 12, 2017 - 5:00pm - 7:00pm

Room 407 Cathedral of Learning

In order to prepare for Rubin's visit, GSWS is offering two reading groups open to faculty and graduate students. These are meant as an invitation to read Rubin's less famous works, get re-familiarized with her two field-opening essays, and situate them in her broader trajectory over the past 40 years. 

Reading Group: Gayle Rubin

September 28, 2017 - 5:00pm - 7:00pm

Room 407 Cathedral of Learning

In order to prepare for Rubin's visit, GSWS is offering two reading groups open to faculty and graduate students. These are meant as an invitation to read Rubin's less famous works, get re-familiarized with her two field-opening essays, and situate them in her broader trajectory over the past 40 years. 

Lecture: “Race, Face, Ravage, and Lyrical Fat: Deleuze and Childhood Poverty”

September 29, 2017 - 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Kathryn Stockton, Univ. of Utah

“Race, Face, Ravage, and Lyrical Fat: Deleuze and Childhood Poverty”

Might we strike at the monolith of Poverty by using the blade of the sexual child?  Might we cut the face of the racial cliché of the child-in-peril-in-the-third-world?  We must be seduced . . . by a face . . . on the move—even by its motions in lyrical fat.  Bringing Deleuzian movement to bear on the face of childhood poverty—raced and gendered faces in literature, documentary, and film—stirs new matters.  Specifically, surprisingly, the body has sex with the notion of (its) face.  What does this mean?  How does it queer perspectives on poverty?

 

 

 

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