spring 2017 | Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
University of Pittsburgh
Events

spring 2017

Lecture: "At One Point We All Rebelled": Hip Hop Graffiti Grrlz and the Performance of Feminist Masculinity

March 24, 2017 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Jessica N. Pabón, SUNY New Paltz

Hip Hop masculinity has been theorized almost exclusively in relation to cisgendered men and shaped by the question: what does the performance of mainstream Hip Hop masculinity do to girls and women? Frequently focused on toxic hypermasculinities, the question predetermines the answer: girls and women in Hip Hop experience low self-esteem, low social status, and exploitation (in terms of sex and labor). In short, they are always already victims. Instead of asking what Hip Hop masculinity does to them, Dr. Jessica Pabón asks what graffiti grrlz do with masculine gender performance.

Lecture: "On the Sexual Genesis of Thought in Deleuze"

March 17, 2017 - 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Matt Lovett, GSWS Visiting Instructor

Third SC Meeting of spring term

March 17, 2017 - 10:00am - 11:30am

Lecture by Jane Ward (UC Riverside): "The Tragedy of Heterosexuality"

March 16, 2017 - 4:00pm - 5:30pm

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Sponsored by GSWS, cosponsored by the Humanities Center and the Year of Diversity

This event is part of a cluster of spring term events on masculinities. For more masculinities events, click here.

In this work in progress, Jane Ward revisits early lesbian feminist theory to interrogate one of the basic premises of the gay rights movement—that heterosexuality is easier than queerness.

Discussion-based Colloquium with Prof. Jane Ward on her book "Not Gay"

March 15, 2017 - 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Speaker/Participants: 
For Graduate students and Faculty

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Although the U.S. media has recently been abuzz with commentary about sexual fluidity, most accounts have focused on “girls who kiss girls” for the pleasure of male spectators, or men of color “on the down low” who are presumed to be gay and in the closet.  But where do white men—the dominant culture’s most normalized and idealized figures—fit in to these narratives?

​In this provocative book, Jane Ward follows straight white men’s homosexual encounters across numerous sites—from biker gangs and public bathrooms to college fraternities and the United States military—illustrating the unique ways that whiteness and masculinity converge to circumvent the cultural surveillance applied to men of color.  Ward shows that the homosexual contact of straight white men is hardly an accident; instead, it does a good deal of productive work for white heteromasculinity.  When white men approach homosexual sex in the “right” way—when they make a show of imposing it and enduring it—it functions to bolster not only their heterosexuality, but also their masculinity and whiteness. By taking sex between straight white men as its point of departure, Not Gay offers a new way to think about heterosexuality—not as the opposite or absence of homosexuality, but as its own unique mode of engaging homosexual sex, a mode characterized by pretense, disidentification and racialized heteronormative investments.lity, but also their masculinity and whiteness. By taking sex between straight white men as its point of departure, Not Gay offers a new way to think about heterosexuality—not as the opposite or absence of homosexuality, but as its own unique mode of engaging homosexual sex, a mode characterized by pretense, disidentification and racialized heteronormative investments.

 

Professor Ward will also give a lecture on her current book project on the fragility of heteronormativity on Thursday afternoon. 

Cosponsored by the Humanities Center and the Year of Diversity at Pitt.

This event is part of a cluster of spring term events on masculinities. For more masculinities events, click here.

 

For more information on Prof. Ward, see http://www.janewardphd.com/index.html

For information on the book up for discussion, see:

http://www.amazon.com/Not-Gay-between-Straight-Cultures/dp/1479825174

Spring Break: No Classes

March 6, 2017 (All day) - March 11, 2017 (All day)

Angry Subjects: In/Civility, Christian Nationalism, and the Paranoid Position in an Age of Trump

March 1, 2017 - 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Professor Ann Pellegrini (NYU)

Sponsored by Religious Studies.

In her now-classic 1981 essay “The Uses of Anger,” Audre Lorde, commends anger as a force that allows us to attend to histories of structural oppression.   In particular,  she urges women of color to name and speak their anger aloud and challenges white feminists to hear it without getting defensive.  “The angers between women will not kill us," Lorde writes, "if we can articulate them with precision, if we listen to the content of what is said with at least as much intensity as we defend ourselves against the manner of saying.

LGBTQI+ Faculty/Staff Affinity Group: First Meeting

February 23, 2017 - 5:00pm - 7:00pm

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion is excited to announce the LGBTQIA+ Affinity Group for university professional staff and faculty. Over the last several months, both members of the staff and members of the faculty have met with members of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion to identify resources available for members of the LGBTQIA+ community, including networking opportunities, professional development funding, and support groups in light of current events throughout the country. The LGBTQIA+ Affinity Group will serve as an umbrella organization in order to provide these opportunities to members of the community. The group will also offer the community an official, collective voice for LGBTQIA+ issues at Pitt, will serve as a liaison to upper administration, and will provide support for recruitment and retention of faculty and staff.

Our committee has planned a mixer that we would like to invite members of the LGBTQIA+ faculty and staff community at Pitt to attend at 5801 Video Lounge Café in Shadyside, on Thursday, February 23rd 5:00pm-7:00pm in order to provide an opportunity for members of the community to get to know each other. At this mixer, we will also brainstorm about the future direction of the affinity group and about possible projects involving both faculty and staff. At this time, we ask that only individuals who identify within the community join us for this program; at future programs and events, we are happy to welcome allies to join us as well. If you plan to attend, please fill out the following RSVP: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VN8QR96

All are also welcome to join our Facebook Group to stay connected about future events:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1233573180056851/?fref=ts

If you are interested in joining the group but are unable to attend the inaugural event, or have ideas to contribute for the vision of the group, please feel free to contact Interim Co-Chairs Julie Beaulieu at JRB107@pitt.edu, or Michael Wellbrock at MJW125@Pitt.edu and we will add you to our e-mailing list. 

Conversations on Europe Virtual Roundtable: "Transgender Europe”

February 21, 2017 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Organized by European Studies Center at Pitt. Discussion moderated by Todd Reeser, Director of GSWS.

 

Join the ESC for a moderated “virtual roundtable” on the issues facing transmen and transwomen in Western and Eastern Europe today.

Lecture: "The Dangerous Public Fantasies of Post-racialism and the Black Bogeyman"

February 17, 2017 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Professor Ronald Jackson (University of Cincinnati)

Cosponsored by the Depts. of Communication and Africana Studies, the Cultural Studies Program, the Year of Diversity, and the Humanities Center.

This event is part of a cluster of spring term events on masculinities. For more masculinities events, click here.

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