Spring 2017 | Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
University of Pittsburgh
Events

Spring 2017

Discussion with Ron Jackson: "Teaching about Race: Whose Intellectual Traditions Matter and What We Can Do About It?"

February 17, 2017 - 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Prof. Ron Jackson

Cosponsored by the Depts. of Communication and Africana Studies, the Cultural Studies Program, the Year of Diversity, and the Humanities Center.

 

Second Steering Committee Meeting of spring term

February 17, 2017 - 10:00am - 11:30am

Round Table: “From Stonewall to the Supreme Court”

February 16, 2017 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Round Table

This event is part of the Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences Open Door Project.

For more information on the project, see http://www.opendoor.pitt.edu/about

 

Lecture by Rostom Mesli (Post-doc), "The Complexities of Integrating Complexity: Notes on the Theoretical and Political Challenges of Intersectionality"

February 14, 2017 - 4:00pm - 5:15pm

View event flyer here

What is intersectionality? What are the theoretical underpinnings of the concept? What does an intersectional politics look like? Is it liberal or is it radical? Is it politically enabling or paralyzing? Such questions have caused controversies in feminist and queer theory and politics. This talk seeks to open a way out of some of those conundrums by showing that they result from a conflation of different understandings of intersectionality. Against a view of intersectionality as self-evident, the talk highlights three very different understandings, each corresponding to different historical moments, and each sharing more with their context of origin than with the other versions of intersectionality.

This event is part of a cluster of spring term events on intersectionality. For more events click here.

Undergraduate lecture by anupama jain (GSWS): "Historicizing Asian/American (Trans)National Feminisms"

February 9, 2017 - 4:00pm - 5:15pm

Telling the story of Asian immigrant communities in the United States is a complicated business of unpacking an unstable collection of signifiers: “Asian,” “American,” nation, woman, etc.

Undergrad Lecture by Patricia Ulbrich, GSWS Visiting Scholar, "Activist & Academic Alliances in the Women’s Movement Community in Pittsburgh”

February 2, 2017 - 4:00pm - 5:15pm

Sponsored by GSWS. 

Pittsburgh was a major hub of the contemporary women’s movement in the United States. This paper analyzes the formal and informal networks among activists and academics that contributed to the emergence of the women’s movement community in Pittsburgh during the period 1968-1973. We discuss issues of feminist identity among networks of activists and academics, the organizational structures and practices that helped or hindered alliances among them, and how they shaped strategies used to confront employment discrimination and develop the women studies program at the University of Pittsburgh.

Lecture by Jennifer Nash (Northwestern), "Love Letter from a Critic, Or Notes on the Intersectionality Wars"

January 31, 2017 - 4:00pm - 5:30pm

"Love Letter from a Critic, or Notes on the Intersectionality Wars" follows the word “critic” around the black feminist archive, endeavoring to trace its myriad meanings by asking: Who are intersectionality’s critics, and what precisely makes those scholars’ works critical?  Why has the term “critic” come to circulate and proliferate around intersectionality in recent years?

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