Fall 2016 | Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
University of Pittsburgh
Events

Fall 2016

Lecture: "Being a Gender: The Transgender Child and Changes in the Self"

October 27, 2016 - 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Prof. Tey Meadow, Columbia University

Sponsored by GSWS, and co-sponsored by the Children's Literature Program, the Dept. of Sociology, and the Year of Diversity.

Jazz Jennings, Caitlin Jenner, Laverne Cox. Transgender people are everywhere. How do we understand the rapid, explosive entrance of trans* into the contemporary lexicon? One way might be to think this the beginning of a feminist, post-gender utopia. Focusing on research with the families of transgender youth, I’ll argue for a vastly different way to understand the proliferation of gender categories in recent years, and what it tells us about what it means to “be” a gender today.

A second event, called "Gender and the Child: A Roundtable on Queer Method," will take place in 501 Cathedral of Learning from 12:30-2:00.

Professors Meadow, Julian Gill-Peterson, and Amanda Chapman will discuss methodolgies for studying the child, including the transgender child. Please join us!

View the event flyer here.

Round table and Discussion: "Gender and the Child: A Roundtable on Queer Method"

October 27, 2016 - 12:30pm - 2:00pm

Professors Tey Meadow (Columbia U), Julian Gill-Peterson, and Amanda Chapman will discuss methodolgies for studying the child, including the transgender child. Please join us!

View the event flyer here.

Sponsored by GSWS. Co-sponsored by the Children’s Literature Program, the Humanities Center, the Department of Sociology, and the Year of Diversity.

Fall Break: No classes for students

October 17, 2016 (All day)

Second Steering Committee Meeting

October 14, 2016 - 10:00am - 11:30am

Ginger and Gender, Queer Cinema and AIDS: GSWS Graduate Students present their research

October 6, 2016 - 4:00pm - 5:30pm

Two GSWS Certificate Graduate students will present some of their research in gsws studies:

Laura Stamm (Film St), "The Desire to See and Be Seen: New Queer Cinema’s Response to the AIDS Crisis" 

Gay and lesbian film festivals started showing up in major cities like San Francisco, Seattle, and New York City around the time of the AIDS crisis—a time of death, loss, and totalizing assault on queer selfhood and community. In other words, these film festivals emerged at a time when the queer community more than anything needed to see images of what it looks like to be queer. This paper looks at the intersections of queer artistic production and political consciousness during the AIDS crisis, exploring the ways in which film festival culture provided new ways of seeing and envisioned new ways of being. 

Donica O'Malley (Communication), "'You Just Can't Do the Macho Thing': Discussions of Gender and Sexuality from Ginger Oral Histories"

Over the last decade, men who are “gingers” (or have red hair, light skin, and freckles) have been stereotyped as effeminate, weak, and sexually undesirable, while redheaded women have been subjected to a beautiful/ugly dichotomy. Based on oral history interviews from Portland’s 2016 Redhead Event, I will discuss how people who have been labeled as gingers understand their own gender and sexuality both within and outside of these stereotypes.

Lecture: “Disability Culture Pedagogies: When Having Fun Together is Radical Practice”

October 4, 2016 - 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Petra Kuppers, Professor of English, University of Michigan

Cosponsored event.Sponsored by the Center for Bioethics & Health Law and the Humanities Center.

Abstract:  This talk opens by discussing the use of disability stories in a wider social milieu that stigmatizes disability and limits the play with difference. How can teachers help students see the generative and complex potential of disability’s signification, in a world that still stigmatizes and limits disability expression? There is a disjuncture between disability culture’s rise and richness on the one hand, and mainstream ideas about difference on the other. As teachers, we need to find ways forward. The talk will argue for radical play in disability representation, through a discussion of the use of genre fiction in classrooms, and the use of embodied pedagogy exercises. With a range of examples, the talk will move toward new ways of incorporating disability’s difference into creative writing, teaching practice, and social justice work.

Annual PACWC Lecture and Reception for New Women Faculty

September 28, 2016 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Prof. Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Dept. of French and Italian

Hosted by the Provost's Office and GSWS.

2500 Posvar Hall.

When we think of medieval holy women we mostly think of mystics, of visionary women enraptured, absent from this world, and seeking union with God. While these aspects are important parts of medieval mysticism there is another, more practical side, to mystical visions: especially in the late Middle Ages, in a time of turmoil and endless warfare in Europe, holy women found a political voice through divinely sent visions. My talk focuses on the two most powerful and influential of these visionaries: Saint Birgitta of Sweden (1303-1373), canonized three times between 1391 and 1436, and Saint Catherine of Siena (1347-1380), canonized in 1461 and since 1970 a Doctor of the Church. Through their visions and revelations they attempted to intervene in some of the most important crises of their time: the Hundred Years War, civil conflicts in Italy, and the Great Schism of the Western Church (1378-1417). In my illustrated lecture I explore how they used their visions in order to construct a political program, how they strove to implement it through letters and personal interventions, and how their detractors zeroed in on their feminine nature to attack and discredit them.

 

 

Women Behind Bars: Author Event with activist Victoria Law

September 27, 2016 - 7:30pm - 9:30pm

Barriers to reproductive health care? Inadequate access to general medical care? Pervasive sexual harassment and abuse? Women across the country face these injustices; women behind bars experience them on a more intense level. Join Victoria Law, journalist and author of Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles Of Incarcerated Women, for a  discussion on realities and resistance inside women’s prisons and concrete ways that those on the outside can support resistance struggles inside.

Presentation: "Women Behind Bars: Realities and Resistance"

September 27, 2016 - 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Victoria Law

Sponsored by GSWS

The popularity of Orange is the New Black  has led to a growing interest in the drastic number of women behind bars. But what's missing from the show? How are women themselves challenging and organizing against prison conditions? How can people on the outside support their actions and resistance? Join Victoria Law, journalist and author of Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles Of Incarcerated Women, for a discussion on realities and resistance inside women’s prisons and concrete ways that those on the outside can support resistance struggles inside.

 

Victoria Law is a freelance journalist who focuses on the intersections of incarceration, gender and resistance. Her work has appeared in Al Jazeera America, Bitchmedia, The Guardian, The Nation and Truthout. Her first book, "Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women," examines organizing in women's jails and prisons across the country. Her next book, tentatively titled "Your Home is Your Prison," critically examines proposed "alternatives" to incarceration and explores creative and far-reaching solutions to truly end mass incarceration.

Round Table and Discussion: "Trigger Warnings, Title IX, and my Syllabus"

September 23, 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:15pm

Your students talk about trigger warnings, and you're not sure what to do. Should you put something on your syllabus? If so, what? A student talks about sexual assault in a written assignment in your class. What do you do? What are you obligated to do? Should you have put something on your syllabus for situations like this?

Join us for a round table and discussion on these issues during the lunchtime hour. Graduate students and all faculty welcome.

Round table participants include Julie Beaulieu (GSWS), Dana Och (Film), William Scott (ENG), and Katie Pope (Title IX Coordinator, Office of Diversity and Inclusion)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Download a PDF of the event flyer here.  

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