Fall 2010 | Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
University of Pittsburgh
Events

Fall 2010

"Reading the Wilde Trials"

October 12, 2010 - 9:45am - 11:45am
Speaker/Participants: 
James R. Kincaid (Aerol Arnold Chair in English and Professor of English at the Univ. of Southern California)

English

Oscar Wilde’s first trial was one he sought:  in 1895, he brought a libel charge against the Marquess of Queensbury, who had accused him of being a “somdomite” [sic].  Queensbury’s defense was that the charge was true.  Queensbury was acquitted, and in a second trial, Wilde was charged with sodomy and gross indecency and found guilty.  The trials were a crucial event in the history of homosexuality, and the colloquium will take up the construction and pathologization of deviance at work in them.

 

Colloquium with Gregory Seigworth

October 7, 2010 - 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Gregory Seigworth (Millersville)

Humanities Center

"What is Affect Theory?"

Discussion of co-authored book introduction, "An Inventory of Shimmers"

"Reproductive Rights in Pennsylvania"

October 6, 2010 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Rebecca Cavanaugh, L.L.D., Vice President for Public Affirs of Planned Parenthood of Western PA)

Sponsor - Women's Studies Program

Rebecca Cavanaugh is Vice President for Public affairs of Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania. She worked as a community organizer for American's for Democratic Action and campaigned for Hillary Clinton for President during the Iowa caucuses. A lawyer, she received her undergraduate degree in Women and Gender Studies from Rutgers University.  Her work focuses on domestic and international reproductive justice and human trafficking. She will talk about reproductive rights and policy issues, especially as they shape Pennsylvania politics.

View the event flier.

"Speaking with the Damned: or, Prison Education, Social Justic, and Communication as a Human Right"

October 2, 2010 - 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Stephen John Hartnett, Univ. of Colorado at Denver

A Public Lecture

Respondents

Gerard Hauser, University of Colorado at Boulder

Marcus Rediker, University of Pittsburgh

 

Part of the Twelfth Biennial Public Address Conference

“Human Rights Rhetoric: Controversies, Conundrums, and Community Actions”

September 30 - October 2, 2010

hosted by Department of Communication, University of Pittsburgh

http://www.pitt.edu/~comm/

"Human Rights Rhetoric: Controversies, Conundrums, and Community Actions"

September 30, 2010 - 5:00pm - 9:00pm
October 1, 2010 - 8:00am - 7:00pm
October 2, 2010 - 8:00am - 8:00pm

Human rights have been asserted, recognized, reaffirmed, and undermined around the globe. Yet what the expression, “human rights,” designates and ought to encompass has been, and will continue to be, the subject of international controversy. At a concrete level, “rights” have a paradoxical quality that renders them contingent on individual, communal, and national commitments and actions.

Conference site: http://www.pitt.edu/~comm/test4.html

"'From the Eye to the Soul': Industrial Labor's Mary Harris 'Mother' Jones and the Rhetorics of Display"

October 1, 2010 - 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Mari Boor Tonn, Univ. of Richmond

Respondents:

Lawrence Prelli, Univ. of New Hampshire

Cara Finnegan, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Part of the Twelfth Biennial Public Address Conference

“Human Rights Rhetoric: Controversies, Conundrums, and Community Actions”

September 30 - October 2, 2010

hosted by Department of Communication, University of Pittsburgh

Conference site - http://www.pitt.edu/~comm/test4.html

"Human Rights Rhetoric: Controversies, Conundrums, and Community Actions"

September 30, 2010 - 5:00pm - 9:00pm
October 1, 2010 - 8:00am - 7:00pm
October 2, 2010 - 8:00am - 8:00pm

Human rights have been asserted, recognized, reaffirmed, and undermined around the globe. Yet what the expression, “human rights,” designates and ought to encompass has been, and will continue to be, the subject of international controversy. At a concrete level, “rights” have a paradoxical quality that renders them contingent on individual, communal, and national commitments and actions.

Conference site: http://www.pitt.edu/~comm/test4.html

"Human Rights Rhetoric: Controversies, Conundrums, and Community Actions"

September 30, 2010 - 5:00pm - 9:00pm
October 1, 2010 - 8:00am - 7:00pm
October 2, 2010 - 8:00am - 8:00pm

Human rights have been asserted, recognized, reaffirmed, and undermined around the globe. Yet what the expression, “human rights,” designates and ought to encompass has been, and will continue to be, the subject of international controversy. At a concrete level, “rights” have a paradoxical quality that renders them contingent on individual, communal, and national commitments and actions.

Conference site: http://www.pitt.edu/~comm/test4.html

"Adoption, Identity, and Confidentiality: The History of Closed Records"

September 30, 2010 - 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Elizabeth Samuels (Professor, Univ. of Baltimore School of Law)

Pgh. Consortium for Adoption Studies, University of Pittsburgh Arts & Sciences, School of Law, and Women's Studies Program

Currently, when children are adopted, they are usually issued new birth certificates in which the names of adoptive parents replace the names of birth parents. Copies of their sealed original birth certificates have been unavailable to adult adoptees in most states for varying numbers of years. But recently many states around the country have considered, and some have passed,  legislation restoring adult adoptees’ right to receive uncertified copies of their original birth certificate upon request.

House Bill 1978, now in the Pennsylvania House Health and Human Services Committee, would restore this right, overturning the 1984 law that foreclosed access.  Another bill in the House, H. B. 1968, takes a different approach: it would  establish procedures by which a court or agency must locate birth parents and obtain consent before providing identifying information to an adoptee.

PACWC Reception welcoming new women faculty with lecture by Nicole Constable

September 29, 2010 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Speaker/Participants: 
Nicole Constable (Professor of Anthropology, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research)

Provost's Advisory Committee on Women's Concerns & Women's Studies Program

Lecture by Nicole Constable: "Telling Tales of Migrant Workers: Religions, Activism, and Women's Life Scripts."

http://www.provost.pitt.edu/pacwc/news.html

RSVP appreciated by Sept. 20 (email women@pitt.edu).

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